5 delicacies native to Yorkshire

5 delicicies of yorkshire
It’s not until you venture out of these parts of the world that you realise local delicacies aren’t necessarily consumed or even heard of by the majority. Until a few years ago I’d never heard of a Parmo and don’t even get my started on a ‘Stottie’. If you’re visiting Yorkshire for the first time, here’s my list of the top local cuisines you must try whilst your there. Oh and I’ve opted to list the lesser known options so sorry Yorkshire Puddings, as delicious as you are you didn’t quite make the cut!

1. Yorkshire Parkin – baked mainly around Bonfire Night, Parkin is a sticky ginger cake baked with syrup and black treacle. Parkin is mainly associated with Leeds and is always served alongside the Bonfire Toffee and Pie & Peas served for Bonfire Night. This wonderful delicacy has maintained its native origin and is practically unheard of anywhere south of Hull, a true piece of Yorkshire.

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2. Pikelets – a pikelet is pure and simply a flat crumpet, now a days a pikelet is linked to the regions of the West Midlands but in my Nana’s era (1930’s) it was a true Yorkshire product.

3. Pontefract Cakes – eaten all year round and now on sale in Marks & Spencer, Pontefract Cakes are round chewy liquorice sweets made right in the heart of Yorkshire. They have been in manufacture for over 250 years and our local love of them still reigns strong.

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4. Lemon Curd – Curd is used for all sorts of recipes, my favorite is Curd Tard, it is essentially a baked Cheesecake and is made with spice! History tells us it’s most famous for being consumed around Whitsuntide. If you’re looking to pick up one of these then visit Betty’s Tearoom whilst in Yorkshire, they do a fantastic rendition of the classic.

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5. Wensleydale Cheese – no big surprise this one made my list but Wensleydale Cheese originated from the little town of Wensleydale which is located in North Yorkshire. Now available to buy in most patisseries throughout the UK and most certainly enhanced in popularity through the references of Wallace and Gromit. It was reported that after the 2005 release of Wallace and Gromit Curse of the Were-Rabbit sales rocketed by 23%.

Have you any more to add to our list? Share with us your favourite dishes!

7 comments on “5 delicacies native to Yorkshire

  1. I actually want to eat this post in its entirety. I haven’t heard of Pikelets, but my Grandma used to make ‘dropped scones’ which were like tiny little pancake things. Mind you, my family are Northumbrian where as I’m Bradfordian, so maybe that’s more of a Northern thing?

    • Oh wow, I’m just looking at dropped scones now, I’ve never heard of them! X

  2. As someone who is Yorkshire born and bred this is perfect. I’d never heard of no 2 if I’m being honest but I’ll keep an eye out for it.

    I was also a little surprised that no 4 is a unique Yorkshire item, I thought it was global.

    Have a fabulous time on your trip to Thailand.

    • Ah excellent, a Yorkshireman! Really I’m intrigued to know which two you’d not heard of. Thank you very much! :)

  3. Lemon tart is absolutely delicious! I could have it as a dessert almost every day. Have a lovely day, Iga xxx

  4. It was my late grandmothers job to punch the stamp on the pontefract cake when it was Dunhills.

    Jason – Pontefract born and bred :)

    • Wow Jason! That’s fantastic! I was born just up the road in Doncaster :)

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